2019 Festival

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October 7, 2019 | DesignPhiladelphia, 2019 Festival
Newly developed epicenter of design east of City Hall, East Market, will host the Open House of all Open Houses for all design lovers, during DesignPhiladelphia on Thursday, Oct 10. As one of the most innovative and transformative projects in Center City, East Market is a natural location partner for the festival. Located in the heart of the city, East Market will highlight the impact designers can have on the resurgence of a community and how a space can empower makers, thinkers, doers, and believers to grow and reimagine possibilities. So much to do and so much to see — let’s dive into what East Market has planned. Opening Monday, October 7 th, come check out the “Circle Up” Light Install by Lucky Dog Studio in collaboration with DesignPhiladelphia. The exhibit strings together 360, 30” hula hoops, that will cover a total of 2,250 square feet through the center of East Market. The installation is a nod to the linking of shops, restaurants, workspaces, dwellings, and community members that make this property flourish while showcasing a Philly-based design team. Ingrained deep within the culture of the East Market community is an appreciation for designed public spaces which really gets to...more
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October 4, 2019 | DesignPhiladelphia, 2019 Festival
This exhibition brings together some of ongoing design research projects at the Polyhedral Structures Laboratory (PSL) at the University of Pennsylvania Stuart Weitzman School of Design. Each work on display is a unique design response to specific conditions of forces being brought into equilibrium. These examples illustrate an unconventional design method that introduces the inclusion of force equilibrium at the very early stages of design. With this method, a designer can precisely control the geometry of the flow of forces in a three-dimensional space to design architectural structures. PSL is an interdisciplinary research center working at the intersection of architecture, structural engineering, computer science, mathematics, and material science to bridge the gap between engineering and design. The works in this exhibition were designed using new methods of 3D Graphics Statics developed by the Weitzman’s School’s Assistant Professor of Architecture Dr. Masoud Akbarzadeh. PSL has developed a software based on this research called Polyframe Beta, a geometry-based, structural form-finding plugin for Rhinoceros3d. This tool allows architects and structural designers to explore a variety of unconventional spatial structural forms, accessing possibilities that they could not discover or design before. PSL is part of the Advanced Research and Innovation Lab in the Department...more
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October 4, 2019 | DesignPhiladelphia, 2019 Festival
My high school locker room was covered with the same motivational posters that hang in athletic facilities around the world: “Hard work beats talent.” “If you can believe it, you can achieve it.” And the perennial coaching favorite — “There is no ‘I’ in team.” While the intention of that axiom was right, I think the coaches were wrong. Teams are made up of a bunch of “I”s — Individuals with unique personalities, skills and needs. On the field or in the office, a team performs at its best when the needs of the group are supported while also addressing the needs of each member. We need to think about the “me within the we.” Teamwork has never been more important or in higher demand. As digital transformation disrupts industries everywhere, companies are banking on collaborative teams to drive innovation and growth. According to our recent study, people collaborate because they feel it will lead to new and better ideas, increase work accuracy, improve productivity and create more innovative solutions. The study also found more than half of people’s time is spent working with others. So, leaders don’t need to convince us to collaborate with our teams—we’re already doing it...more
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October 4, 2019 | DesignPhiladelphia, 2019 Festival
Curated pieces solve open plan design challenges Amanda Schneider is President of ThinkLab , the research division of Interior Design magazine. ThinkLab combines Interior Design magazine’s incredible reach within the architecture and design community with proven market research techniques to uncover relevant trends and opportunities that connect back to brand and business goals in a thought-provoking, creative, and actionable way. In what has been dubbed “the privacy backlash” many workers are finding themselves less productive in open-office floorplans. Designed to increase collaboration and spur innovation, open-concept spaces have their place in the office, but so do quiet, stimuli-managed areas to focus on heads-down work. The sweet spot lies in the ability to offer choices to employees who spend the day working on a variety of tasks and therefore require their environment to mirror their working needs. Today, we’re seeing a drive to design legible spaces and territories or zones that offer visual and acoustical privacy and perceived barriers from the open office. And, we’re beginning to see more flexible solutions than the traditional drywalled office setting pop up in response. Specifically, we’re looking at furniture that addresses architectural needs, including pieces that are moveable, affordable, and less-time-consuming to create. These...more
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October 4, 2019 | DesignPhiladelphia, 2019 Festival
Today’s designers collaborate in multidisciplinary teams. With this reality in mind, the University of the Arts School of Design has re-envisioned its curriculum, empowering students to pursue their passions, broaden their design exposure and become the innovative design leaders of the future. Starting with the project theme Design as Play , students from the UArts Graphic Design, Illustration, and Product Design programs joined forces to envision and fabricate the One Design kinetic sculpture for DesignPhiladelphia. Participants will be asked to think of one design - whether it be an app on your smartphone or an ergonomic toothbrush - and write their answer on a ping pong ball. They then launch their One Design ball 15 feet into the air, through a maze of tubes and back down to earth. The ball joins others in an on-going statement about design within the Philadelphia community. A website archives the collection of responses. Within the project’s lighthearted premise lies a valuable truth: it’s good to take a moment to reflect upon the way our lives are touched by design. It is the operating system running in the background of our daily lives, involving all our senses and influencing all our actions. As human...more