Plein Air Sketch Tour of Carpenter's Hall and Surrounding 18th Century Buildings

Plein Air Sketch Tour of Carpenter's Hall and Surrounding 18th Century Buildings
  • Non-CFAD Program
  • Tour
  • Workshop
Plein Air Sketch Tour of Carpenter's Hall and Surrounding 18th Century Buildings
Date:
Saturday, September 14, 2019
Time:
9:00 AM
Location:
Carpenter's Hall
320 Chestnut Street
Philadelphia, PA 19106
Cost:

ICAA Members: $50, General Admission: $60 | Registration Required

This tour is organized and presented in whole by the Institute of Classical Architecture & Art


The characteristics of watercolor wash, with its transparency and ability to be graduated, make it ideal for conveying atmosphere and distance. In this one-day seminar and workshop, led by architect and watercolorist Cameron Macatavish (Voith & Mactavish Architects LLP), will cover techniques and best practices for applying traditional Beaux Arts sketch and watercolor techniques. Held at Carpenter’s Hall in Independence National Historic Park, the workshop will use a limited and portable palette and produce 2 different sketches from historic Old City Philadelphia’s built environment.

Schedule: 9:00-9:30 Registration at Carpenters’ Hall with pastry and coffee. 9:30-10:30 Brushes, palette and composition discussion. Demonstration of wash technique. 10:30-12:00 Individual sketching around Carpenters’ Hall 12:00-1:30 Lunch and critique/instruction (lunch will be provided) 1:30-3:00 Individual sketching 3:00-4:00 Refreshment and final discussion

Class size is limited to 12 students. Public transportation is easy and convenient and parking is available in the City Garage on 2nd Street. Students will be responsible for bringing their art supplies. A short list will be provided upon registration. Cameron J. Mactavish, AIA, LEED AP, is a founding partner of Voith & Mactavish Architects LLP with over thirty years of design experience through projects that range from large new buildings, such as Villanova University’s in-progress performing arts center, to smaller-scale projects, such as the restoration of Drexel University’s Furness-designed Peck Alumni Center. During a travel study trip through the highlands of Scotland in 1983, he refined his artistic technique for representing architecture and landscape elements through sketches and watercolor, which has become the backbone of his career as an architect.

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